A closer look at… The Grand Budapest Hotel

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The Grand Budapest Hotel is rated 15 for strong language, sex references, brief gory images. The film is available on DVD.

The Scoop

A girl sits on the snowy steps of a memorial to a great author, reading a book entitled The Grand Budapest Hotel. In flashback, we meet the author (Tom Wilkinson), who begins to explain how the book came into being. As a younger man (Jude Law), staying in the crumbling Grand Budapest during the 1960s, he met the hotel’s owner, Zero Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham). In his turn, Zero relates his own youth as a lobby boy during the hotel’s golden years.

Young Zero (Tony Revolori), an immigrant in the middle-European Republic of Zubrowka, is taken under the wing of the hotel’s flambouyant concierge Monsieur Gustave (Ralph Fiennes). When one of Gustave’s elderly lovers, Madame D. (Tilda Swinton), dies, she bequeaths him the priceless painting Boy With Apple – leaving him in hot water with her grasping family. Zero and Gustave take off with the painting, setting off a series of comic escapades which play out against the shadowy backdrop of a coming war.

Continue reading A closer look at… The Grand Budapest Hotel

A closer look at…High-Rise

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High-Rise is rated 15 for strong violence, sex, very strong language

The Scoop Stylish, gripping, possessed of a powerful nasty streak, High-Rise is not for the fainthearted.

Handsome, inscrutable Dr. Laing (Tom Hiddleston) moves into an apartment in a newly built high-rise block. The tower has every amenity, from a gym to a swimming pool and supermarket. He meets people from the floors below him – Wilder (Luke Evans) and his pregnant wife Helen (Elizabeth Moss) – and from the better-appointed floors above, including Charlotte (Sienna Miller) and the building’s penthouse-dwelling architect, Royal (Jeremy Irons).

Something is wrong in the tower. The extravagant lifestyles of those on the upper floors lead to simmering resentments beneath, spilling over into violence and anarchy. The thin veneer of civilisation will be peeled back to reveal the horrors beneath.

Continue reading A closer look at…High-Rise

A closer look at…Slow West

Hey, it’s a new Film Blog feature!  I’ll now also be covering films which have recently been released on Netflix, Amazon Prime, BBC iPlayer, or other popular on-demand services, or on DVD. This way, you can host a film club evening from the comfort of your own home, or catch up on hidden gems you might have missed the first time around.

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Slow West is rated 15 for strong violence. Available on DVD and Netflix.

Warning: Contains plot spoilers

The Scoop  An odd, atmospheric arthouse Western with a few surprises up its sleeve

Young Jay (Kodi Smit-McPhee) has travelled all the way from Scotland to the American frontier to find the girl he loves: Rose (Caren Pistorius), who fled there with her father under shady circumstances. A helpless idealist in a country of hard, cynical men, Jay looks set to meet a violent end, and soon.

He is rescued by Silas (Michael Fassbender), who offers to protect him on his journey in exchange for money. But unbeknownst to Jay, Silas is hoping to kill Rose and her father and claim the bounty on their heads.

Continue reading A closer look at…Slow West